Rechercher

Dernières publications

--> Url version détaillée , Url version formatée Structure name contains or id is : "409065;155441;135971;102266;212248;578082", Publication type : "('ART')"
724.
titre
Fluorescence excitation/emission matrices as a tool to monitor the removal of organic micropollutants from wastewater effluents by adsorption onto activated carbon
auteur
Ronan Guillossou, Julien Le Roux, Angélique Goffin, Romain Mailler, Gilles Varrault, Emmanuelle Vulliet, Catherine Morlay, Fabrice Nauleau, Sabrina Guérin, Vincent Rocher, Johnny Gasperi
article
, IWA Publishing, 2021, 190, pp.116749. ⟨10.1016/j.watres.2020.116749⟩
titre
Urban pathways of biocides towards surface waters during dry and wet weathers: Assessment at the Paris conurbation scale
auteur
Claudia Paijens, Adèle Bressy, Bertrand Frère, Damien Tedoldi, Romain Mailler, Vincent Rocher, Pascale Neveu, Régis Moilleron
article
, Elsevier, 2021, 402, pp.123765. ⟨10.1016/j.jhazmat.2020.123765⟩
titre
Intra- and inter-site variability of soil contamination in road shoulders – Implications for maintenance operations
auteur
Damien Tedoldi, Rayan Charafeddine, Philippe Branchu, Eric Thomas, Marie-Christine Gromaire
article
, Elsevier, In press, ⟨10.1016/j.scitotenv.2020.144862⟩
titre
The NORMAN Association and the European Partnership for Chemicals Risk Assessment (PARC): let's cooperate!
auteur
Valeria Dulio, Jan Koschorreck, Bert van Bavel, Paul van den Brink, Juliane Hollender, John Munthe, Martin Schlabach, Reza Aalizadeh, Marlene Agerstrand, Lutz Ahrens, Ian Allan, Nikiforos Alygizakis, Damia’ Barcelo’, Pernilla Bohlin-Nizzetto, Susanne Boutroup, Werner Brack, Adèle Bressy, Jan Christensen, Lubos Cirka, Adrian Covaci, Anja Derksen, Genevieve Deviller, Milou Dingemans, Magnus Engwall, Despo Fatta-Kassinos, Pablo Gago-Ferrero, Félix Hernández, Dorte Herzke, Klara Hilscherova, Henner Hollert, Marion Junghans, Barbara Kasprzyk-Hordern, Steffen Keiter, Stefan Kools, Anneli Kruve, Dimitra Lambropoulou, Marja Lamoree, Pim Leonards, Benjamin Lopez, Miren Lopez de Alda, Lian Lundy, Jarmila Makovinská, Ionan Marigómez, Jonathan Martin, Brendan Mchugh, Cécile Miège, Simon O’toole, Noora Perkola, Stefano Polesello, Leo Posthuma, Sara Rodriguez-Mozaz, Ivo Roessink, Pawel Rostkowski, Heinz Ruedel, Saer Samanipour, Tobias Schulze, Emma Schymanski, Manfred Sengl, Peter Tarábek, Dorien ten Hulscher, Nikolaos Thomaidis, Anne Togola, Sara Valsecchi, Stefan van Leeuwen, Peter von der Ohe, Katrin Vorkamp, Branislav Vrana, Jaroslav Slobodnik
article
, 2020, 32 (1), ⟨10.1186/s12302-020-00375-w⟩
titre
An experimentally-determined general formalism for evaporation and isotope fractionation of Cu and Zn from silicate melts between 1300 and 1500 °C and 1 bar
auteur
Paolo Sossi, Frederic Moynier, Robin Treilles, Marwane Mokhtari, Xiang Wang, Julien Siebert
article
, Elsevier, 2020, ⟨10.1016/j.gca.2020.08.011⟩

Tutelles

Membre de

New York Times : Fighting ‘Les Pipis Sauvages’ With Public Urinals

par Daniel Thevenot - publié le

The New York Times : Fighting ‘Les Pipis Sauvages’ with Public Urinals (3 February 2017)

The Uritrottoir urinal can grow flowers in its compost

In cities the world over, men (and, to a lesser extent, women) who urinate in the street — al fresco — are a scourge of urban life, costing millions of dollars for cleaning and the repair of damage to public infrastructure. And, oh, the stench.

Now, Paris has a new weapon against what the French call “les pipis sauvages” or “wild peeing” : a sleek and eco-friendly public toilet. Befitting the country of Matisse, the urinal looks more like a modernist flower box than a receptacle for human waste.

You can even grow flowers in its compost.

The Parisian innovation was spurred by a problem of public urination so endemic that City Hall recently proposed dispatching a nearly 2,000-strong “incivility brigade” of truncheon-wielding officers to try to prevent bad behavior, which also includes leaving dog waste on the street and littering cigarette butts. Fines for public urination are steep — about $75.

Even that was not deterrent enough, officials say. A small brigade of sanitation workers still has to scrub about 1,800 square miles of sidewalk each day. And dozens of surfaces are splattered by urine, according to City Hall.

Enter the boxy Uritrottoir — a combination of the French words for “urinal” and “pavement” — which has grabbed headlines and has already been lauded as a “friend of flowers” by Le Figaro, the French newspaper, because it produces compost that can be used for fertilizer. Designed by Faltazi, a Nantes-based industrial design firm, its top section also doubles as an attractive flower or plant holder.

The Uritrottoir, which has graffiti-proof paint and does not use water, works by storing urine on a bed of dry straw, sawdust or wood chips. Monitored remotely by a “urine attendant” who can see on a computer when the toilet is full, the urine and straw is carted away to the outskirts of Paris, where it is turned into compost that can later be used in public gardens or parks.

Fabien Esculier, an engineer who is known in the French media as “Monsieur Pipi” because of his expertise on the subject, said the Uritrottoir was more eco-friendly than the dozens of existing public toilets which dot the capital and are connected to the public sewage system.

“Its greatest virtue is that it doesn’t use water, and produces compost that can be used for public gardens and parks,” he said.

So far, Paris’s Gare de Lyon, a railway station that has become ground zero in the capital’s war against public urination, has ordered two of the toilets, which were installed on Tuesday outside the station, and the SNCF, France’s state-owned national railway, says it plans to roll out more across the capital if the Uritrottoir is a success.

“I am optimistic it will work,” said Maxime Bourette, the SNCF maintenance official who ordered the toilets for the railway. “Everyone is tired of the mess.”